December 3, 2008

Getting the Blues

Oil on museum quality, archival ampersand gessobord™ panel - 6” x 8”


I was at the art supply store yesterday and finally decided it was time to replace the ancient tube of Cerulean Blue paint that I've had in my paintbox since high school. I needed a dab of it the other day and found it lacked a certain youth. I also bought a tube of Cobalt Teal on impulse. (Cobalt Teal? Who knew?) I have been impressed with some of my fellow daily painters pool/ocean paintings and wanted to play with the genre. Splashing around in all that blue paint was totally foreign to me. My early palette layout was decidedly Dutch, with just a touch of Ultramarine keeping the earth tones company, to cool down the shadows. Although Salvador Dali disapproves of the pigment in his book "Fifty Secrets to Magic Craftsmanship," I also keep a bit of Prussian Blue on my palette. Laying on the paint in such a free manner was cathartic. It is good for a realist painter to remember what the medium is capable of. I didn't wait 30 minutes after eating to jump into this painting. I'm happy to report that I did not get a cramp.

11 comments:

Diane said...

a wonderful frisky fellow making some very well painted wake! Is this a K9 swimmer from the doggie paddle? if so may I send the link on to HSBC? They would love to post it.

Mark Adams said...

Yes it is. I would have painted Louis but he looked so forlorn and miserable, like a poodle caught in a downpour.

Moe Lodin said...

Hello mark,

I've been following your blog for some time now. It encourages me to get back on track painting at those dull days, if you know what i mean. Thanks. Anyway, i have a question: Do you ever use a projector or likewise when you scetch up your paintings?

Mark Adams said...

Moe,

I had one of those things years ago, which did help lay out the huge photo-realist fashion paintings that I did in the 80's. I gave it to my daughter to play with. Grids, cartoons, loose sketches, squinting your eyes, whatever it takes to lay in a painting is valid. This is an age old question. Vermeer used a camera obscura, Norman Rockville an opaque projector and no one questions their artistry. Use what you feel comfortable with. Good drawing cannot make up for bad painting technique.

Jelaine Faunce said...

Excellent job o the water and the dog's face! Water paintings are hard, but you managed to make it look easy. Good job!

Mark Adams said...

Thanks, Jelaine. It was fun but definitely not easy. I have new respect for the water painters out there.

Diane Hoeptner (hep-ner) said...

Wonderful!

Mark Adams said...

Thanks, Diane.

WWW.OLDIVAD.COM said...

Beautiful handing and rendering water. Did you find Gessobord/Claybord panel is so smooth that you have tough time to laid your paints down? I find it to take very long time to wait for the paint to dry before I move on to next glaze. Thanks. Love your work.

Mark Adams said...

Indeed, Gesspbord can be frustrating. Some pigments stay in place, others want to move around on their own or not leave the brush. Still, I find the subtle tooth and hard support nice to work on. A soft watercolor brush is helpful in blending out misbehaving strokes.

Thanks for the compliments, Oldivad. I just took a peak at your site - Very Nice work!

kay Crain said...

Hey Mark,
Love this and I love Cobalt teal. I use it in all my pool and ocean scenes. Well done!